Guest Blog!

I asked one of my college friends to write a little bit about what suicide meant to her and how it made her feel. Below is what she wrote to me in regards to that. She did okay me to share her name, so please read what Megan Bush had to day. Raise awareness through talking, sharing, and asking the tough questions. Sometimes that may be exactly what it takes to help somebody through a tough situation. Love you guys, and I can not say thank you enough for all of the support!

 

“The one thing that bothers me the most is when others say that who people commit suicide and those who suffer from depression are weak. What people don’t see is that those who suffer from depression or suicidal thoughts are fighting their own demons. Looking back on Chester Bennington’s death, it really hit home for me. He may have not been a relative or someone close to me personally but he was certainly a voice of my generation. The only way you’ll ever hear his voice is if you listen to any of Linkin Park’s music or an old interview of the band. Just think how hard it must be if it was someone close to you personally. You’d never see or hear that person again. You’d rely on old photographs and home videos to recall all the good moments in time.

I’ve felt just as heartbroken when X Japan’s member’s Hide and Taiji passed away. Both members committed suicide but out of the two, Hide’s death caused hundreds of people to gather at his funeral and even two fans attempted suicide that same day due to being grief stricken. Yoshiki, the drummer and leader of the group, mentioned in the “We Are X” documentary that these deaths and even his own father’s at a young age really pulled at his heartstrings. If you ever get the chance to listen to X Japan’s music, especially the song Jade, the emotions are all there. The pain that we feel after a loved one has passed can be intolerable but, it doesn’t mean we have to live with the constant sadness or let the feelings consume us until the simplest things we can no longer do. By keeping their memories alive and living to make a better future for ourselves, we can help positively influence other’s lives by raising suicide awareness.

When I lost my friend in a car accident a few years ago, it was almost unheard of for me. How I found out was looking through my Facebook noticing mutual friends were posting all about the recent death of our high school friend. It was sudden and unexpected. I remember breaking down into tears wanting the news to be fake but, this was reality. My friend was dead all because a truck driver wasn’t paying attention to the road. It was tough for me to go to school and work for a few days still trying to wrap my head around the fact my friend had passed. I can only imagine that’s what the family and friend’s of people who have taken their own lives. But at the funeral, it was the strangest reunion of meeting friend I haven’t seen in years. We talked for hours talking about the good old days of middle school and high school while laughing to mask the pain we were all feeling at the time. Knowing I wasn’t the only one feeling painfully upset about the whole ordeal gave me some piece of mind. It was pleasant to know we were all there supporting each other and our deceased friend’s parents.

In reality, I think it’s important to try and support those close to you suffering from any sort of mental or emotional issues. Everyone has their own inner demons but it also doesn’t mean everyone fully understands. Something may impact someone else in a much bigger way than it may affect you personally. Rather than bringing each other down, helping each other could save the lives of many especially at schools with all the bullying. In respect of Chester Bennington, here’s a quote from him; “You can’t be afraid of people willing to hurt you, cause if you fear life, then you will never live.”

-Megan Bush

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